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  1. Yoko Shimomura discusses new music for Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue and soundtracks for Kingdom Hearts III

    On October 6th, 2016, in London, UK, Symphonic Fantasies was held featuring music from various franchises including Kingdom Hearts. At the Symphonic Fantasies concert, Yoko Shimomura, composer of the Kingdom Hearts series, discussed music for Kingdom Hearts. Many wondered about the music for Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue, releasing on January 24th, 2017, and the anticipated Kingdom Hearts III. Shimomura says that she has written new music for Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue and that she has a ton of tracks planned for Kingdom Hearts III with the high expectations in mind.
    Shimomura also addressed Kingdom Hearts in general and some of her experiences as she developed and composed the music for the games.

    You can check out her responses below. Thanks go to KH13 News Team members AndrewHankinson & Aquaberry for attending and taking note of the responses given by Yoko Shimomura. You can also check out some of the pictures they took below.

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    [UPDATE] KH13 News Team Member AndrewHankinson has added the questions from the audience members and answers from Yoko Shimomura including a question asked by KH13 News Team Member Aquaberry. Please let us know if you asked one of the question on the night!

    GARETH DAVIES (Interviewer/Principle Flute player and Chairman in the London Symphony Orchestra)
    Now, your career in video gaming has spanned over 3 decades. The industry now is changed beyond all recognition since you started composing for games. When you decided not to accept the job as a piano teacher, but you decided to compose for games instead, how did you colleagues and family react?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Yes, now-a-days you have all these games and concerts, and so many people come to listen to them. And everyone knows about game music, but back then it was a really minor profession when I started and so the reaction I got from other people was…”You’re going to do what?” “What, you’re going to make little bleepy noises?” They just didn’t understand what it was I was going to be doing.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Now, the London Symphony Orchestra, as you know, has played lots of film soundtracks like Star Wars, Harry Potter, and now-a-days we do quite a lot of film music concerts and film music has been…it’s gradually being more accepted on the Classic FM Hall of Fame. Do you find that gaming music is finally now taken more seriously by people who go to other kind of concerts?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I started checking the charts a couple of years back and I’ve been keeping an eye on it for the last year or two. And when I first saw one of my own compositions on there 2 years ago, it was a really moving experience. I thought I’m standing side by side, shoulder to shoulder with Beethoven. Hearing my music played by the LSO, by such an amazing and respected orchestra is really an honour for me. I’ve always loved orchestras since I was a child and it just makes me really happy.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Thank you. That’s really kind of you. We love playing your music too. Especially my flute solos.

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I actually used to play the flute as a high-school student.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Oh wow!

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I’m not about to play for you. Maybe in another life I can be your pupil.

    GARETH DAVIES
    If you teach me composing, yes. Speaking of standing shoulder to shoulder with Beethoven, what a lot of people may not know (I don’t know if you know!) is that you are, in the Classic FM Hall of Fame, the highest female composer, ever!

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    What an honour! I’ve hardly ever been number one at anything. I always thought that happiness was to carry on doing what you love whether or not I got to number one or number two or number three or number four. But that was happiness and so it’s a real surprise to be number one and I’m very very grateful because it’s of everyone here.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Now, after graduating in Osaka in 1988, you found success very very quickly, composing many now legendary soundtracks including I have to say one of the games I used to spend hours playing when I should have been practicing flute at college: Street Fighter 2. That’s up there! Now, Street Fighter 2 was the first score that you wrote that’s actually released as a stand alone soundtrack album, which is quite a huge thing particularly for gaming music at the time. Can you tell us how important that was for you and how important you think it was for the development of the way gaming music was accepted? Sorry, they’re very long questions.

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Yes, Street Fighter 2 was such a big hit and the soundtrack did so well, and it’s an honour for me that they continue to use my music all the way through. It’s really something that has a lot of memories for me. But back then they weren’t using the internet like they do now; there wasn’t Facebook, there was no Twitter. So we didn’t really know if my music was successful or not.

    GARETH DAVIES
    That’s really interesting. So since the internet has been invented (yes, some of us remember when it wasn’t!) have you found that’s been a really useful tool for keeping in contact with fans and seeing how they feel about your music?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I think in a way it’s because of the internet, that I’ve got to where I am today. That I’m sitting here on this stage because as a composer what you do is quite solitary. You’re shut away, you’re plugging away at composition and you don’t have a chance to hear what people think about what you do. So sometimes if I’m feeling down or if I’m going down in the middle of the night, I just type in I wonder what people think about such and such a piece. All these amazing positive comments and that really cheers me up and gives me that need to carry on.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Oh, there you are. So ladies and gentlemen; you know what to do! Get on Twitter straight away! …Don’t forget to tag London Symphony Orchestra!
    Now in 1993, when you joined what’s now Square Enix, when you started working for the them the kind of games that you composed for seemed to change to more fast role-playing games which also seemed to coincide with the change in style in your music. Writing for the games which have a more complex narrative; something which attracted you to Square Enix as apposed to the not so complex narrative of Street Fighter 2, I think is fair to say.

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I’ve always like classical music so writing/composing those pieces with the drums and guitars wasn’t really my strong suit. But I did somehow ended up starting writing for all those fighting games and it was fun, but I did want to try something that was more suited to me. That was more classical and I also wanted to try composing for role-playing game and yeah there was a sense in which Square did have those kind of games that appealed to me.

    GARETH DAVIES
    It is very beautiful music and it’s interesting because hearing it in the orchestra. It’s like the whole thing expands.!What I do find fascinating about your music is the many many different themes for all the characters. There are so many individual motifs that are all different but they all fit together in the same way. When you compose a new game score, tell us how you do it, how you start? Do you see the gameplay, do you get shown pictures of the characters? Do you see characters and ideas for themes popping to you head? How do you start with such a huge project?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    That’s a hard question, but it’s difficult to answer because I don’t really think too hard about it, when I’m composing for a new game. I will have pictures of the characters, the story, I might see some background art, and then all of that combined stimulus comes together and I don’t really try to compose it. I just wait for something to appear.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Oh wow! So it’s easy?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    It’s easy if something comes to me.

    GARETH DAVIES
    So do ideas come to you when you’re sitting down at your piano or your desk or when you walk around? Do you have to lock yourself in room and just wait?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I never know when the ideas are going to come to me. I don’t know when they’ll appear, I don’t know when they’ll disappear, so it’s really about how I just seize them when they do show up.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Well you’ve seized a lot! If you have an idea, write it down!

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    If I get an idea right now I’ll have to go backstage and try to write it down before I forget.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Now in 2002 you composed the music to Kingdom Hearts. [crowd applause] I know where this is going! Now, it’s amazingly a game that solds 4 million copies; it’s an incredible amount of people playing it! Now, famously it’s with the Disney characters. They are already really well loved characters, but also have a lot of very famous musical themes. We’ve all whistled various Disney themes, my daughter never stops. Was that a daunting prospect, going from one set of well loved characters to another and having to integrate them?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I would be lying if I said I wasn’t nervous, but I would also be lying if I said that it was really daunting and that I’d feel like I’d be under a lot of pressure. I had seen a lot of Disney films myself and I had my reactions to those; you know I was moved by them or I found them sweet. I just wanted to get those feelings across in the music with their reactions. So bits of it were difficult but a lot of it was wonderful as well!

    GARETH DAVIES
    It’s great. That’s some of my favourite music CDs! Now, nobody's listening…but the eagerly awaited Kingdom Hearts III? Now for a game franchise that you’ve been involved with for such a long time, how’s it been revisiting some of those characters?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Yeah, there’s a lot of expectations to live up to and think there are people that are hoping for great things and of course Tetsuya Nomura is doing his best as well. So I think I will be writing a lot of music for that, but before that there’s actually 2.8 which is coming out, and I’ve already been writing new music for that – quite a lot! It has been a while since I’ve done it and so I just hope it will live up to people’s expectations. And yeah, just watch this space!

    GARETH DAVIES
    [indicating to the audience] You can see how excited they all are!
    Now, Kingdom Hearts is regularly listed as one of top game soundtracks, and I personally would like to know do you have a favourite soundtrack of your own that you’ve written, and also a favourite by another composer?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    That’s such a tough question and I can never answer it because when it comes of my music and my soundtracks, they’re like my children and I love them all the same even the naughty ones. The particularly bad, but I love them all and they’re all important to me and I can’t say I like this one more than that one, so I can’t answer that question. Sorry. When it comes to other people’s music, again there’s so much that I like and it’s hard to pick just one off the top of my head so I’m going to have to apologise again and say I can’t answer that one either.

    GARETH DAVIES
    When you come back next time, you can think about it.

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I’ll have a think. I’ll be ready!

    GARETH DAVIES
    Excellent! Now before we open the floor to questions with my two beautiful assistants with microphones, it has been a pleasure talking to you and it’s a pleasure playing your music! I’m sure that there might be some young people out there who would also like to compose for games. Is there something that you wish you’d known when you were starting out that you know now that you would be able to give them some advice?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Well now-a-days I think people have much better technology than I had back then and I think the more familiar you are with that, the more technology you take on board, the better; the more you’ll be able to improve! But that’s not so much something I wish I knew back then, and neither is this, but I guess I would say just don’t give up doing what you love! Stay strong, keep passionate and value small things! Small responses; things that move you however small they are in the music. It’s there in music that you write; there’s something that moves you and that what you need to respect and to know it. Because it’s there.


    GARETH DAVIES
    That is very good advice for everybody I think. Thank you very much!




    QUESTIONS FROM AUDIENCE



    GARETH DAVIES
    Now, I’m sure, everyone’s shifting in their seats! I’m sure lot of you may have some questions that you would like to put to our guest!

    QUESTION 1
    Hello. Thank you for joining us in London. Thank you for coming to see us and speak to us. I would like to know the story of how you composed the boss battle music for Final Fantasy XV?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    That was 2007 Tokyo Game Shows. That was about 9 years ago? Yes I’m really glad that’s finally been used! At that time I wrote it for a trailer at the Tokyo Game Show and I really wanted it to be used for a game and I wanted it to be a battle song. That’s why it’s got that intense rhythm and it’s very dramatic and fast-paced, but I also wanted you to be able to go through that whole emotion in just one piece. That’s how it came about!

    QUESTION 2
    What composers and artists in general have inspired you?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    When I started this work, I already loved classical music and I’d listen to so much classical music that I don’t know if I could have told you who’d written what there was so much of it and it’s all had influence on my music. As a child I just loved classical music and I loved the piano of course, so I think some of the famous piano composers like Chopin, like Rachmaninoff. Those are some of the big influences but there are so many. So so many!

    QUESTION 3
    Hello. You’ve had such a wonderful career. What three words would you use to describe your journey you’ve been on during that time and why have you chosen those words?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Give me a minute. …Sounds a bit corny maybe but love, passion, feelings.

    QUESTION 4
    I was just thinking, you were saying there just before that you decided to be a composer, you were thinking of going to be a piano teacher. I was just wondering what made you decide not to take that easy path? What made you think, no this composition thing is a good idea?

    GARETH DAVIES
    I’m not sure piano teaching is quite as easy.

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Well I did like games and then there were a lot of people becoming piano teachers and I thought it’s going to be hard to stand out and be a really good piano teacher amongst so many. So I wanted to do something that was different from what everyone else was doing and I thought no one’s really writing video game music, and I like games so why not give it a go.

    GARETH DAVIES
    I think it’s the other way round now; everybody wants to compose music for video games!

    QUESTION 5 (Aquaberry’s question)
    Hi. I met you 3 years ago so I’m really happy to see you again in London. This question is actually from my friend who lives in America; she told me "You have to ask her this!" Also she told me "You have to tell her that I love her!" because she’s very inspired by [you] because she also wants to be a composer. Her name’s Becca by the way, and Becca asks: when you were composing Vector to the Heavens, what sort of feelings did you go through or what was your journey to composing such a powerful piece? Because I know that there’s a lot of love and a lot of pain in that music, so we’re all very interested hearing how you composed it.

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    If you’re familiar with Kingdom Hearts you’ll know how important that music is in the story and I really wanted to get across the sadness of Xion’s destiny and the sort of sense of unfulfillment. It’s really hard to describe in words; you’ll have to listen to the music to get it. But just the whole of the character and what they go through I wanted to get it there in the music and I would almost always be crying with tears in my eyes as I was composing that music. I also had tears in my eyes because of all the requests coming from Tetsuya Nomura!

    QUESTION 6
    Video game music is very different in certain ways from all other kinds of music because the player interacts with the game and because of that, the music as well has to be very flexible to be able to repeat, to be fade in and out as the situation changes. I was wondering as a composer how have you had to sort of shape your style around those challenges where it has to be flexible in a way that a lot of other music just doesn’t have to be; where it has to be scripted to a set scene or where it has to fit a lot of different scenarios?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Yeah there are various challenges for example in the first Kingdom Hearts in the question/answer bit with the stain-glass, where based upon what the player chooses, that determines what the next step is, all that music is connected but you have to set up so that you can jump from there to different other pieces. [It’s] The same with the last boss battle; you have to be able to jump to different bits for the music.

    QUESTION 7 (Asked by DarkSeekerCosplay, a Xemnas cosplayer)
    What gave you the idea when composing Xemnas’ theme (Disappeared)? What emotion did you have for that sort of theme?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Is that the fast one? They showed me the battle scene for that one and my impression was it was really fast and the attacks came really quickly so I knew it had to be a fast-paced piece that would latch to the action in the battle scene.

    GARETH DAVIES
    I love the fact that you’ve written so much music you have to ask everyone how it goes.

    QUESTION 8
    This is actually a question for Gareth. I was wondering when LSO gets music that’s new, temporary or whatever next concert you do like tonight, what’s the process i.e. how far in advance do you get the piece to read through and look at or does it come naturally because they’re such professionals?

    GARETH DAVIES
    Oh, we’re just amazing! But seriously, it’s slightly different for concerts; we’ve been rehearsing this for a couple of days, but when we do film soundtracks and video games, we turn up at Abbeyway Studios usually at 10 o’clock in the morning, or 5 to 10, and at 10 o’clock a whole pad of music about that thick [indicates with his fingers an inches’ width] appears on the stand and we sightread it and they put the red light on and they record it. So when I said we were amazing I wasn’t that far! The LSO recorded the very first soundtrack in 1934 for H.T. Mell’s film and have recorded films ever since. We are now officially the most extremed orchestra in the world. So really we’re very very quick, we get given music and it’s very quick; when you hear quite often we do a lot of education work with the London Symphony and we go to schools and we recorded music for the Harry Potter films, and there’s the moment when Dobby dies which is my flute solo. I apologise if that’s a plot spoiler! Quite often when children find out that we’ve done films like that, they’ll say could you play me that bit from the film, and the truth of the matter is I probably only played three times in my life. So the answer is you get the music on the day, and you sight read it and then you record it, and that’s it! Good question, thank you!

    QUESTION 9
    I’m going to ask a specific question about the Kingdom Hearts soundtrack. So you write a lot of music obviously, so first of all, when you wrote the main theme Dearly Beloved, were there any pieces that you wrote and discarded or did you come to Dearly Beloved straight away? Did any of those first drafts or second drafts get reused in the game? And also this is a slightly separate question, what’s your sort of workflow? How much music do you write in a day?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    Dearly Beloved came to me quite quickly. The opening shoot it was based on was meant to be the sea and so I think the idea of the first Kingdom Hearts but also there was this instrument back then, I don’t know if you know, it was called the sound canvas. And one of the sound effects was the sea shore and so I just used that in the demo that I created.
    In terms of workflow, it really varies as to how much I can process in a day or how long I spent doing it. If it’s all going well I might write 7 pieces in a day or if it’s not going so well I might spend a few days without completing one piece. I’ve never really tried to stick to a rule like I must finish 3 a day or anything like that. If there’s a deadline coming up then that can make it a bit difficult but it’s quite flexible.

    QUESTION 10
    Hello. Thanks for writing so much music. I’ve got your music on loop on a daily basis; it really helped me throughout my education and work as well! My question is when Final Fantasy versus 13 became 15, what had they told you and what happened to most of your music? Also what opinions do you have regarding this change because it changed quite a lot in regards to story?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    I guess everyone was surprised by that change of title. I was surprised to be honest. When it became 15, most of the music is just carried through apart from a very small part of music that wasn’t quite right, but it’s mostly still all there because the basic world of the music is the same! So, there may have been concerns, but as far as the music goes, there’s no need for concern. It’s still there, just carried on; my feelings for it are just the same.

    QUESTION 11
    Hi. So basically I was wondering with Birth by Sleep, in regards to the main trio of protagonists (Terra, Aqua and Ven), we’ve heard snippets of them at the secret ending of Kingdom Hearts II: Final Mix (Fate of the Unknown). I was wondering had the you and the team decided then or did you pick them out afterwards?

    YOKO SHIMOMURA
    The themes for Terra and Aqua were arrangements part for that secret ending because I predicted that it was going to be their story coming up next when composing for that secret ending. So I wanted to be able to connect it through to their themes.
    So I already had that in mind but at that stage it was just me thinking of what I thought might happen but when it did actually happen then I got permission from Tetsuya Nomura to use those phrases for Terra and Aqua’s theme songs and that’s how it came about.

    GARETH DAVIES
    Ladies and gentlemen, at the beginning of this talk, our composer was worried that we wouldn’t have enough time, that we’d have TOO much time and then nobody would have had anything to say or have any questions, but I think we could probably could go on all night! However it almost time to let the music do the talking which is the other thing you’ve came here for. So, before we just wrap up here can you please give a huge round of applause for Yoko Shimomura!

    • Oct 08 2016 06:18 AM
    • by Jake
  2. Yoko Shimomura discusses composing for Kingdom Hearts III and Kingdom Hearts series in new interview with RPG Site

    In an interview with RPG Site, Yoko Shimomura, composer of the Kingdom Hearts series, describes the challenges she's faced while working on the Kingdom Hearts series and how that process has changed as the series continued to grow and expand. She also briefly touches on her work for Kingdom Hearts III, discussing the differences between composing for that game and Final Fantasy XV.

    An excerpt of the interview can be found below:

    Besides her work on new arrangement albums, Shimomura is of course knee-deep in working on Square Enix Japan’s two largest upcoming releases – Kingdom Hearts III and Final Fantasy XV. While she’s had an impressive career spanning everything from her incredible, seminal work on Street Fighter II to Parasite Eve, Terra Battle and the Mario RPG series, these two titles are undoubtedly her biggest undertaking yet – and a slightly daunting one.

    “Well, of course, they're completely different,” she says of the two. “The story is completely different, the image is entirely different, the tone... For Kingdom Hearts, I've been working on it for quite a while now. Because of that I can make new suggestions myself, I can change the direction and I have ideas about where to take it myself.”

    Shimomura’s history with Kingdom Hearts is an interesting one. At one point in our meeting, she detours to explain that though she now has the confidence and history with the series to be bolder in pushing it in new musical directions, initially her instructions were quite different to what her gut told her to create.

    “In my mind, Kingdom Hearts is very simple - very much Disney, cute and sweet,” she explains. “My original ideas for it were in that area - but on the contrary, I was asked to make very heavy stuff. There was quite the gap between my original idea and what was requested... filling that gap is really the heart of my job! That was what I did with the first Kingdom Hearts.”

    One of the greatest challenges that series has provided to Shimomura since becoming a success is balancing the wishes of fans with presenting new musical themes and ideas.

    “A lot of game fans feel special feelings towards the original versions of pieces, always,” Shimomura laughs, going on to explain that recreations or evolutions of tracks that fans have already built up a love for are some of the hardest to create. “A lot of the time I consider it brushing up and improving, rather than outright rearranging,” she concludes.


    Are you looking forward to hearing Yoko Shimomura's latest compositions in Kingdom Hearts III? Let us know in the comments!

  3. Yasue talks KH3 world selection, wanting to be involved with future titles/saga, & dealing with the complex story

    Following the interview reveal last week that Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 ReMIX and Kingdom Hearts HD 2.5 ReMIX could be coming to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, IGN has posted the second half of their interview with Tai Yasue, the co-director of the Kingdom Hearts series.

    This full interview covers when we might see Kingdom Hearts III, the world selection process for Kingdom Hearts III and future entries, both fans and development staff alike dealing with the series' complex story, Yasue's personal wish to be involved with future Kingdom Hearts titles ("especially if it's a new saga"), and the team's goal to have Kingdom Hearts III help with expanding and revitalizing the Japanese video game market.

    Check out the full interview at IGN, or read it below, in full.

    Yasue: “Nomura has always been working on Kingdom Hearts III full-time, so nothing’s really changed there. Nomura is really the visionary, so he doesn’t work on the nitty gritty details. That’s something we do in Osaka; alongside development, we do the technology. That hasn’t really changed. We get Nomura’s input but it’s not a day-to-day thing, he just has these big ideas sometimes he tells us about. The pace really depends on how our team’s doing and that was never affected.”

    Yasue: “I can’t make any announcements on the Disney worlds but, even there, there are so many that we’re studying."

    [Yasue explained to me that two teams of programmers were employed, one focusing on 2.5 Remix and the other on Kingdom Hearts III, while the designers split their time evenly between the two projects. Now 2.5 is out the way, it’ll enable them all to focus on Kingdom Hearts III but he doesn’t believe there was ever really a slowdown. Admittedly, getting to grips with Unreal Engine 4 took some getting used to, but he believes the dividends are already paying off.]

    Yasue: “We’ve shown some videos of what Kingdom Heart III looks like and it does look a bit different but it’s still clearly Kingdom Hearts. UE4 was introduced and there’s a lot of stuff that we didn’t have to do previously, like lighting and shading, which we now have to do. The technology is vastly different but it’s exhilarating to have all this stuff to learn. There’s so much we can do, the consoles are so fast. Some of the videos with Sora, with individual strands of his hair moving? That stuff is a real leap in technology. I can’t make any announcements on the Disney worlds but, even there, there are so many that we’re studying. They do a lot of new stuff as well so we’re figuring out how to incorporate them as well.”

    [As everyone’s well aware at this stage, however, Disney has been busy growing its portfolio since the last game in the franchise launched. With both Marvel and LucasFilm now sequestered inside the walled garden of the House of Mouse, speculation has been rife that Avengers or Star Wars-themed playgrounds could make an appearance in the upcoming title. The look of fatigue that crosses Yasue’s face when I ask the question he’s clearly heard a million times before isn’t unexpected, but his answer should give fans some hope.]

    Yasue: “I can’t really go into any specifics or say anything about Star Wars, but when we come up with worlds we really want variety and to make sure that there’s a lot of different types of worlds. Any world that looks special is definitely a consideration; everything from the characters, to how they look and the differences between them. We think Star Wars is great but I’m not going to relate that to Kingdom Hearts III yet! We want a wide variety of worlds and when we come up with ideas, it’s the differences and the originality of each that’s really important.”

    Yasue: “Any world that looks special is definitely a consideration; everything from the characters, to how they look and the differences between them. We think Star Wars is great.

    [Alongside this hint, Yasue said that just because a world has previously appeared in the series doesn’t mean it won’t do so again. Square Enix is taking it’s time to evaluate which worlds will best suit the story and create a diverse experience for players and, until they’re ready, we shouldn’t expect any announcements. What he would admit, however, is that the non-linear structure we’ve come to expect won’t change, saying we’ll be able “to play them as you want”.]

    [Of course, just because Endor or Iron Man don’t end up making it into Kingdom Hearts III doesn’t mean they’ve missed their shot for good. It’s been confirmed before now that Kingdom Hearts as a franchise will continue on beyond the conclusion of The Dark Seeker saga as the games up to this point have been called. Yasue explains he’d like to be part of whatever’s next, especially if it’s a new saga, though he acknowledges one or two issues may need to be addressed.]

    [I first brought up the common complaint that, with so many different instalments on different platforms, a major problem with the franchise so far is how obtuse the story can be. It’s a complaint he acknowledges as fair, joking that even some of the development team find it hard to keep track of the story.]

    Yasue: “Honestly, a lot of the developers, me included, are also sometimes confused. Nomura has all this stuff in his head and sometimes doesn’t tell us. He keeps it secret. So there’s a lot of stuff he says in interviews that surprises us. I think he wants to shock us as well as fans, but a lot of it is hidden from us too!"

    Yasue: “What we do next time around largely depends on the hardware, too. It’s changing so rapidly."

    Yasue: “What we do next time around largely depends on the hardware, too. It’s changing so rapidly and we obviously don’t know what’s going to happen. We’ll be sure to consider the ones that most of our players are using though. We don’t even know the business model or how to sell it. That’s changing rapidly too, so we may have to adjust to that as well.”

    [Despite this, it seems unlikely Square Enix is prepared to let one of its most-loved franchises languish when there’s an opportunity for money to be made. Yasue, however, argues it’s something much nobler that motivates the developers based on the ground. There’s a general consensus this year’s Tokyo Game Show was much more exciting than it has been in previous years thanks to the strong presence of titles like Bloodborne. With the Japanese games industry having been labelled as a dying behemoth for years, the new consoles seem to have offered a second lease of life. According to Yasue, Square is under no illusions about how all the big Japanese developers need to do their bit.]

    Yasue: “With the development of Kingdom Hearts III we want the market to become bigger. We want to be responsible for moving it forward. There’s a lot of stuff, technology-wise, that we have to play catch-up to as well but I think right now we’re doing a lot of new stuff. By making, developing and publishing Kingdom Hearts III, hopefully the Japanese market will change. I think everyone from Square Enix feels that responsibility. We think we’re maybe even the people who are most responsible for doing that. We’re the only people in the right position who are able to change the market."

    Yasue: “As a whole, the market isn’t getting smaller. It’s getting bigger, but it’s going towards smartphone apps. Personally, I enjoy making big budget, huge development games with long cycles so for me it’s exciting and hopefully that translates to the player.”

    [Kingdom Hearts III may still be some way off, but it seems like Square Enix is fully aware of the pressure on it to deliver. As our interview draws to a close, I ask Yasue one more time if we’ll maybe see the game before 2015 is out? “We will make sure to make Kingdom Hearts III as quick as possible,” he says with a tired smile. It seems that’s as good an answer as I’m going to get.]

    • Dec 12 2014 10:09 AM
    • by Sora96
  4. Yasue says 1.5 & 2.5 were 'good training' for Kingdom Hearts III & sharing ideas with FFXV team

    In an interview with Kotaku at last month's European launch event for Kingdom Hearts HD 2.5 ReMIX, Tai Yasue the co-director of the Kingdom Hearts series spoke about Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 ReMIX & HD 2.5 ReMIX being good training for new staff members in preparation for Kingdom Hearts III. He also discusses respecting source material and sharing ideas with the Final Fantasy XV team for the new hardware. You can read the interview below.

    "We have been working on 3 and 2.5 at the same time," he explains, "so a lot of people are crossing over and doing both. There are also a lot of new people working on both. In a way, we've learned what was good about our previous Kingdom Hearts [games] by making 2.5."

    "For 3, we want to evolve it in a new direction, but at the same time we don't want to change what is fundamental about Kingdom Hearts. We're hiring new people continuously, so they are learning about Kingdom Hearts through making 2.5. It's a good learning experience."

    Kingdom Hearts is a unique thing to be working on, says Yasue, due to the necessity of finding a balance between respecting the Disney properties and incorporating original, creative ideas - so the training has been necessary.

    "There's a lot to get used to working with the Disney content," he says. "You have to have a lot of dedication and respect for their visual IPs for example, and when you play Kingdom Hearts 2 you see that: when you summon a character or use a spell there's a lot of love and care that goes into the presentation. When you see Stitch coming out of the screen, for example, it's very true to the original movie. That dedication is something you learn through the process or remaking 2."

    It must surely be restrictive working within those constraints, but Yasue enjoys the challenge that they introduce. "As Square-Enix, if someone else was making a Final Fantasy or a Dragon Quest, we'd be very protective of that too," he ventures. "So we really understand the importance of not changing the brand and respecting the fans. We want to make it true to Disney - we don't want to change it fundamentally. We always strive to make original content, but with Kingdom Hearts you have to really respect the source material, and that's something people really like about the series."

    "As someone who creates games I think the constraints make you really think. They are what make you strive to come up with new ideas - ideas that are acceptable to Disney, and also fun. That balancing act leads to a lot of surprises. It's very challenging, but we work on it daily. We continuously talk with Disney and see what they think is acceptable… but we constantly want to surprise our players, too, so we need flexibility. It is challenging and makes you think."

    The Kingdom Hearts team also benefits from sharing expertise with the other Square-Enix development units, including the Final Fantasy XV team, Yasue says - even though Kingdom Hearts development is based in Osaka. "We trade ideas - especially for PS4, Xbox One, new gen stuff," says Yasue. "We're trying to move in leaps obviously, so there is a lot to learn and a lot to explain to other people. That exchange of ideas and technology is very important and we're doing that inside Square Enix, with other teams."

    • Jan 23 2015 09:22 AM
    • by Sora96
  5. Yasue discusses Kingdom Hearts III's switch from Luminous to Unreal Engine 4, Nomura's involvement, & Disney properties being considered

    In an interview with Eurogamer, Tai Yasue, the co-director of the Kingdom Hearts series, has discussed Kingdom Hearts III in the lead up to Kingdom Hearts HD 2.5 ReMIX's release in Europe. Here, Yasue explained the switch from Luminous Engine to Unreal Engine 4 and its effects on Kingdom Hearts III's development, Tetsuya Nomura's involvement in the development so far, and the prospect of various Disney properties being used in the game. These important portions of the interview can be read below, with a big thanks to Eurogamer.

    On Unreal Engine 4:

    Yasue: "The technology is moving forward a lot. That's something we've learned from the West, I think, in a big way. We're using Unreal Engine 4 right now, and that really has changed the way we make the game. There was nothing wrong with the Luminous engine at all. We decided that Unreal 4 was right for us. There was a huge network of people actually using it, we were communicating with the Japanese people at Epic a lot - it was like a complete product."

    Yasue: "It was easy to shift to, but at the same time though, there was a lot of stuff specific to Kingdom Hearts that we couldn't really do on Unreal 4 at first. So we had a lot of co-operation from Epic - they did a lot - at the same time we were doing a lot of customisation of the engine as well, to suit our needs. A lot of painstaking detail - the shadows for example, the really vivid colours, that sort of thing - we couldn't really do at the beginning, so we had to remake/customise the engine and add a lot of parameters."

    Eurogamer: Given that the game began life on Luminous, does that mean work on the initial teaser from E3 2013 had to be completely scrapped?

    Yasue: "We use the same graphical assets, so we didn't throw any of that away, and I guess a lot of the experience we got from making that for E3, that experience really translated to our development now. It was in our initial production stage, so I think we were learning a lot of stuff while using the Luminous engine."

    On Nomura's involvement since stepping down from being the director of Final Fantasy XV:

    Yasue: "Nothing has really changed. The development team is in Osaka, and Nomura-san didn't really do a lot of the detailed stuff, as he's really the sort of creative visionary. We communicate as much as we did previously, so our working relationship hasn't changed at all. We are speeding up things for development, obviously, on Kingdom Hearts 3 as we move along, but I don't think it has anything to do with Final Fantasy."

    Eurogamer: Has Disney made anything off-limits to the team at Square yet?

    Yasue: "At our current stage, they have not said no. There's a lot to choose from, a lot of wonderful new IPs. No specifics but there are a lot of new IPs that we are considering and there's a lot on our table, and Disney hasn't said no - we don't have any trouble with that."

    On the purpose of the HD collections:

    Yasue: "It's been 12 years since the original Kingdom Hearts came out in 2002; it's been a long while. We want new users to be able to understand the story before going into Kingdom Hearts 3, so I guess that was the plan - making Kingdom Hearts 3 but making it more accessible by making 1.5 and 2.5."

  6. Voice actor Quinton Flynn claims he has not started recording for Kingdom Hearts III

    In a recent tweet, Axel/Lea voice actor Quinton Flynn claims that he has not begun recording for Kingdom Hearts III. This comes just a few months after other voice actors in the series, namely Jim Cummings (Pete, Tigger, Winnie the Pooh) and Bill Farmer (Goofy), claim they have finished their recording process, or at least some of it. You can view the tweet made by Quinton Flynn below:


    Posted Image

    Flynn confirms that he is referencing Kingdom Hearts III and not Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue in another tweet:

    Posted Image


    With the information given to us by these voice actors, how far along do you believe Kingdom Hearts III is? Feel free to discuss in the comments!

  7. Utada Hikaru's music label confirms involvement on Kingdom Hearts III intro song

    Utada Hikaru's manager and father, Utada Teruzane, has announced through his Twitter account, @u3music, that work on the Kingdom Hearts III intro song has begun! In 2013, Teruzane stated that Utada's involvement was undecided at the time. On December 22nd 2016, a curious fan followed up on this message, receiving a reply from Teruzane later that day.

    Posted Image


    Utada made her return to the Kingdom Hearts series earlier this year, collaborating with PUNPEE to create "Hikari/Simple and Clean -Ray of Hope MIX-", included in the opening for Kingdom Hearts 0.2 Birth by Sleep -A Fragmentary Passage-.

    UPDATE: Utada Teruzane has retracted the confirmation for Kingdom Hearts III, saying that they would like to be involved but aren't sure quite yet. You can find a screenshot of the tweet below. The original tweet confirming their involvement is still available on the U3 Twitter account.

    U3 music correction


    Are you excited to have a new Kingdom Hearts intro song? Let us know in the comments!

  8. The two non-trailer Kingdom Hearts III screenshots have been released in HQ

    Two Kingdom Hearts III screenshots that were shown in Square Enix Presents' Spotlight on Kingdom Hearts last week at E3 2015 have been released in high quality. These are not featured in the E3 2015 trailer but have been since in various Japanese magazines. You can view them below.

    KH3 02re

    KH3 03re

    • Jun 23 2015 05:08 AM
    • by Sora96
  9. Tetsuya Nomura's message in the Kingdom Hearts Series Memorial Ultimania translated

    The Kingdom Hearts Series Memorial Ultimania released today in Japan and included in is a message from director of the Kingdom Hearts series, Tetsuya Nomura. The message included concerns Kingdom Hearts III and the Kingdom Hearts series in general. You can read it below thanks to SQEX.info.

    Message from Tetsuya Nomura

    If I had to pick, I am a person more on the dark side like Xehanort and co., I harness the burning anger in my heart into what I create. Kingdom Hearts III’s current development explodes very much in this sense. Each time, it’s a battle with Sora and co. who are the exact opposite of myself, it’s been over 10 years and yet we haven’t reached a conclusion.

    This battle will surely last longer.

    In Kingdom Hearts III as well, I am scheming many challenges that Sora and his friends must overcome, because I myself cannot lose either. And in preparation for the great battle that lies ahead, we have this one book that looks back on their entire journey.

    When I think about it, I had an explosive mindset when I made the first Kingdom Hearts as well.

    Thus when I look back at all the material, I feel that fever again. Fans who will continue the journey so far alongside Sora and his friends will also recall their own feverish enthusiasm. With that passion, we will not lose to darkness, and Sora’s journey will continue onwards.

    The journey still continues, but I would be overjoyed if you stuck with us until the very end.

    • Oct 01 2014 09:29 PM
    • by Sora96
  10. Tetsuya Nomura writes a message regarding the Kingdom Hearts III & Kingdom Hearts Unchained χ news from E3 2015

    Tetsuya Nomura, the director of the Kingdom Hearts, has written a message for fans regarding the Kingdom Hearts III and Kingdom Hearts Unchained χ news from E3 2015. The message from Nomura has him presenting all of the announcements to us, and interestingly mentions that not all the assets/information available were revealed – just a snippet. The message also says that there will be more news soon, so stay tuned!

    You can read the full message below:

    After we announced KINGDOM HEARTS III, we went through some redesigning associated with the change in the game engine. Since we were prioritizing those tasks, we were not able to reveal much new information, but this time, we premiered footage that shows the game in action on the new engine.

    The video is just a snippet, but I believe you can get a glimpse of all the challenges that the development team is taking on.We leaned toward the flashiest of scenes due to the limited length of time, but I hope that viewers can sense that this new world of KINGDOM HEARTS is something that players can enjoy, not only during the powered-up battles, but even when you’re just traversing the map.

    That being said, the true nature of KINGDOM HEARTS III is still to come, so please stay tuned for further information.

    Also, we just made the announcement that KINGDOM HEARTS χ [chi], a PC browser game that was previously only available in Japan, will be coming to North America as KINGDOM HEARTS Unchained χ.

    It is meant to be a handy way to enjoy the world of KINGDOM HEARTS more deeply, so I hope that you try out KINGDOM HEARTS Unchained χ, and imagine your new journey in KHIII.

    KINGDOM HEARTS Series
    Director
    Tetsuya Nomura

    • Jun 17 2015 02:33 PM
    • by Jake
  11. Tetsuya Nomura steps down as Final Fantasy XV director to focus on Kingdom Hearts III

    Tetsuya Nomura, director of the Kingdom Hearts series has stepped down as director of Final Fantasy XV, the title that has been in development since 2006 by the team who developed both Kingdom Hearts and Kingdom Hearts II. Square Enix CEO Yosuke Matsuda has released a statement that confirms Nomura will be focusing his efforts on Kingdom Hearts III. You can read this below thanks to Square Enix.

    “As the director of FINAL FANTASY XV, Tetsuya Nomura has mainly worked on the original concept for the story and universe in addition to creating the characters. Hereafter, he will be focusing his efforts on the production of titles that can only be made possible by Nomura, himself, and delivering products that exceed the quality of past titles, starting with another one of his representative projects, Kingdom Hearts III. Square Enix will continue to work on these titles with the best staff formation in an effort to deliver them to everyone as soon as possible and appreciates your continued support.”


    Update 2: Tetsuya Nomura has answered why he stepped down as director of Final Fantasy XV in the latest issue of Famitsu Weekly. Thanks to sqexgal for the translation, you can read it below.

    "It was the company's decision, I can't say more than that."


    Update: Square Enix Europe have provided some extra insight about Nomura's change within these two projects, and this can be read below.

    Spoiler

    • Sep 24 2014 07:29 PM
    • by Sora96
  12. Tetsuya Nomura says Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue will support 4K resolution through PS4 Pro, theme song for KH3 undecided, no new KH3 news till after KH2.8's release, & more in latest Dengeki PlayStation issue

    In the latest issue of Dengeki PlayStation, which released on October 12th, 2016, Tetsuya Nomura, director of the Kingdom Hearts series, talks about some of his various upcoming titles, such as Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue, releasing on January 12th, 2017 in Japan and January 24th, 2017 to the rest of the world, and Kingdom Hearts III.

    The previous day before the interview had been released, hokanko-alt, a Japanese blog website, gave us a summary of Tetsuya Nomura's interview with Dengeki PlayStation. In the interview, Tetsuya Nomura has stated that Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue will be PS4 Pro enhanced once again, however, he also states that the title will be in 4K as well. We're unsure if the 4K will be upscaled or native. Furthermore, Nomura states that the new remix for Kingdom Hearts 0.2 Birth by Sleep -A Fragmentary Passage- was able to be done as Utada Hikaru, singer of the Kingdom Hearts theme songs, had recently returned to her music work. A new theme song for Kingdom Hearts III is currently undecided, Nomura says. Aside from all that, Tetsuya Nomura has also confirmed that Kingdom Hearts III news will be released after the release of Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue.

    The interview has now been published in the latest issue of Dengeki Playstation and you can view an image of the interview below as well as a full translation thanks to Catherine Mueller (nichiei.translations@gmail.com). The sections focusing on Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue and Kingdom Hearts III have been bolded.

    full page large

    The prototype of [WOFF] was an entirely different game?!


    --[World of Final Fantasy] (from hereon, WOFF), which you first showcased at E3 2015, is going to be sold soon, but what about the details of remaking original game?

    Tetsuya Nomura (hereon shortened to Nomura): There is concept art on our official Twitter, but we originally wanted to create a different game with that world. It was more of a simulation game, completely different from [WOFF]. During that other game's development, we made characters that are now our Primero and Oobito (TN: Everyone seems to be calling it this, but to me it sounds more like Orbit?), and we connected them both into the setting of the game, and then proposed a system in which one could freely switch between them.

    --Primero and Oobito were originally from a different game's system, right?

    Nomura: We had a lot of troubles, and the game was temporarily reduced to a blank slate, and we decided to go ahead and use the loads of chibi character designs for [Pictlogica FF] instead. After that, Chiba (Director Hiroki Chiba) was the one who decided to include Primero and Oobito in the newly designed [WOFF].

    --What characters did you design for [WOFF]?

    Nomura: I designed the main characters Reynn and Lann, as well as Enna Kros. There's also one other character, making it a total of four female characters. I also drew the female key characters on the engraved PS Vita model “Oobito Edition.” By the way, since Enna Kros was a character first designed for that other game I mentioned before, she's been around quite a while.

    --Was there anything you were particularly fussy about with the characters' designs?

    Nomura: We still haven't revealed everything about the four characters I've drawn, but where I'm allowed to touch up things is up to Chiba (laughs). Since these characters are included in the colossal world inside of Chiba's head.

    --We've seen past [FF] characters with voices, but will there be a lot of new characters with voiced parts, too?

    Nomura: That's right, Edgar and Faris, and also, though these aren't characters, the cactuars etc. will have voiced parts. There are also characters like Eiko, who didn't have a voice in the original but had one in other productions (in Eiko's case, she first had hers in [Road of Vermillion]).

    --Did you decide the cast?

    Nomura: Yes, I was involved in both the casting and registration (TN: not sure what this means in game terms!!). When we added character voices to previous [FF] games, we checked the opinions of the users. We see opinions like, “If they ever voice this game, this character reminds me of this voice actor/actress” quite a lot. As far as what I'm involved in creating, I put a heavy focus on the characters' images. For example, with Shadow's voice in [FFVI], I had an image of him in my head alongside Kefka, so in [Dissidia FF Opera Omnia], I asked Yoshito Yasuhara to represent that image.

    --Did you have any parts that you requested for this game?

    Nomura: As far as the content goes, I'm entrusting that to the staff. I occasionally ask them to show me things, but rather than giving them instructions, I'm just checking for problems. I guess I just have specifically nudged at the battle tempo and the ability to easily see the UI.

    --Are there any scenes or events that left an impression with you?

    Nomura: I suppose it would be the entirety of the serious scenes? Because, through the entirety of the [FF] series there is occasionally humor added into some of the more serious stories, but in [WOFF]'s collection of humorous scenes, there is occasionally a serious atmosphere added in (laughs). I think that the serious scenes might look better.

    --Were the PVs gathered and made with that small amount of serious scenes?

    Nomura: That's how it seems (laughs). All of the gags in Chiba's scenes are long, so if we try to show one exchange until the joke happens, the trailer length doesn't fit to scale. Also, when I was checking event scenes, I watched them and thought, “Wasn't it fine to end the joke earlier?!”

    --When they've actually played it, there might be people who are surprised at the mood of some of the scenarios, then?

    Nomura: The world is overflowing with serious stories of a protagonist who must carry out a great destiny, and [WOFF] has that setting, too, but every so often having a fun story like this might not be so bad, I think. It shows the “color” of the director.

    --Please give a message to everyone waiting on the release!

    Nomura: I think a lot of companies are releasing various titles at the end of this year and beginning of the next, but [WOFF] is becoming a production that will not be buried in those other games, and you'll be able to enjoy it for a long time. Since it will be released on the PS Vita, allowing you to play it outside without a heavy system, please try it out and enjoy.

    The HD3 Packaging has a meaning in “Sora (written with katakana)” and “Sora (written with the kanji for “sky”)”!

    --You presented the release date for [Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue (hereon, KH2.8)] at the September SIE press conference, right?

    Nomura: We sincerely apologize for prolonging the release date from December 2016 to January 2017. We wrote it in the comments on the official Twitter, but due to several titles that are coming out one on top of another, this is what it's become.

    --You also revealed a gorgeous package art.

    Nomura: There are actually two secrets about the illustrations from [KH1.5] until [KH2.8]. Extremely attentive KH fans might have already discovered them, but one is that Sora's movements change from sitting, to standing, to walking. One more is that when you line up the three illustrations, you'll notice that they show the flow of time with changes in the sky. [KH1.5] is sunset becoming night, [KH2.5] is the middle of the night, and [KH2.8] is night breaking into dawn. Those three illustrations have a message regarding the final chapter, [KHIII].

    --So you planned all this from the time of [KH1.5]'s release, then?

    Nomura: We worried a long time about the package art for [KH2.5], and we worked on trying to connect the three productions in a continual manner. It seems like there were a lot of people who figured out Sora's movements, but there were not very many people who noticed the connection between the skies. There are two meanings to “sora” (I.E. one being the protagonist's name, and the other meaning “sky”).

    --Since the illustrations were blown up for display at Tokyo Game Show, they really stood out.

    Nomura: Since we were told that we needed to finish the art in time to have it on display at the Game Show, I drew it with my fighting spirit. In result, we finished the package illustration with unprecedented progress.

    --The trial version you presented at Tokyo Game Show seemed to basically be the same as what was at [E3 2016], right?

    Nomura: That's right. It's the version that was revised right after [E3]. The new short cuts functions, etc. from [Kingdom Hearts Dream Drop Distance HD] are the same thing. The master version is having a lot of things brushed up from the TGS version. The production is continuing according to plan, so soon you'll be able to master-up.

    --We got a taste of the evolution of action on the PS4 with [KH0.2] at TGS, but will [KHIII] see an even deeper improvement of action from there?

    Nomura: That's what will happen. Since there is an overwhelmingly large amount of things one can do while playing as Sora in [KHIII] timewise, compared to playing as Aqua. Aqua cannot change her keyblade as the story progresses, but Sora can, and that will in result change the action.

    --The exploration and battles in the latest PV, are those the developments that came after crossing the bridge in the TGS trial play?

    Nomura: Yes. Like what you were able to play in the trial, there is a map waiting up ahead with more added to it. The Osaka production team cleverly placed it as an object, and they're good at making maps with areas outside one's exploration.

    --Let me ask about things connected to [KH X], too. First, the browser game [KH X] ended its service at the end of September, but what are your thoughts on that three years of continued service?

    Nomura: It's too bad that service ended so early, but I think having continued for three years served as a great amount of strength to us. Looking at the user number, there were more people playing the smart phone app [KH Unchained X], so we will now focus on that. As we've already announced, we are planning a season two of [KH Unchained X], so we are continuing its service. In October there will be new worlds available, and we are working on the planned multiplayer function for January release, so please look forward to it.

    --You laid out the last scene of [KH X] to us, but will [KH Unchained X] develop in the same way?

    Nomura: That was only the development for [KH X]. The story for [KH Unchained X] will deviate midway to a different story.

    --In the latest trailer of [KH X Back Cover], there was a figure wearing a black cloak, separate from the five Foretellers, but...?

    Nomura: As we've already revealed in [KH X], that is a character named Luxu. Since he's wearing that black coat, it seems like a lot of people mistook Luxu for the Master of Masters, but they're two different people. The one holding a dandelion on the package art and in the trailer is the Master of Masters, and the other person wearing a black cloak is Luxu. Their relationship is more clearly drawn out in [KH X Back Cover].

    -- Since they serve as a road to [KHIII], you really can't overlook any of the productions included in [KH2.8].

    Nomura: Even among players, there seemed to be some people who were just now hearing about [KH2.8] at the Game Show and seemed troubled, but please, we'd like you to play [KH2.8]. Since it is a prologue to [KHIII], just as it says in the title, you'll need to play to smoothly enjoy [KHIII]!

    --In the latest trailer, we got to hear a new arrangement of Utada Hikaru's “Hikari,” so that stirred up our hopes.

    Nomura: Since I heard that Utada has returned from hiatus, I thought it was perfect timing, and I requested an arrangement from her. We have yet to decide the main theme for [KHIII].

    --By the way, will [KH2.8] be supported on the PS4 Pro, too?

    Nomura: It supports 4K, so it should cleanly play without any problems. Anything else detailed about support, we will showcase next time.

    --Also, when will you be presenting more interesting news on [KHIII]?

    Nomura: We spoke of this a bit at E3, but we are waiting to speak more about [KHIII] after releasing [KH2.8], so we have currently released all available information. Please wait shortly for new news.

    --Since 2017 is the [KH] series' 15th anniversary, we're hoping for a lot of developments!

    Nomura: We are thinking of a lot of plans heading toward the 15th anniversary. Next year's January release of [KH2.8] will be the start, and from March the full orchestra's world tour will commence. It will be a year's worth of non-stop [KH] news, so we look forward to speaking with you again.

    --Finally, please tell us more about the [FFVII REMAKE] that has caught the world's attention.

    Nomura: If it had past materials like [KH], the basics would have been easy to understand, and the staff can understand the hurdles we've had to overcome, but at any rate, the battles in [FFVII] have greatly changed from the original, since they're something with more action in them. The next time I release information about [FFVII REMAKE], I think that I'll definitely have to explain the specifics of what the battle system has become to the players. I think right now that nobody is really able to imagine a concrete battle, so I'm in the middle of coming up with steps that I can show and explain to people, “It's this kind of battle.”

    --Sounds like you're breaking your backs over remaking what was originally a command-based battle system into an action style battle system.

    Nomura: We've heard a lot of [FFVII] fans also say that they want to play the game with the original ATB style, but for the remake we're proceeding toward an action-heavy style. Of course, we've added systems that future fans will be able to enjoy, so people who are bad at action-style battles, please don't worry. For those who excel at action-style battles, we're working to make this a system that's different than what you've used before and can still enjoy. Recently, we checked the Guard Scorpion at the beginning of the game, and I think you'll be satisfied with the realism you'll feel there.

    --2017 is also the 20th anniversary of [FFVII].

    Nomura: Like with the 15th anniversary of [KH], I'm thinking I'd like to plan something or other. It's just that, since we've been keeping busy with productions, including the game [WOFF] that I showcased today, I don't think I will be able to share any new news until after things calm down.


    Would you like a new Kingdom Hearts III theme song with Utada Hikaru? Will you be playing Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue in 4K? Let us know in the comments below!

    • Oct 12 2016 01:55 PM
    • by Jake
  13. Tetsuya Nomura mentions recording for Kingdom Hearts underway during Dissidia Livestream

    During a Dissidia Final Fantasy Livestream on NicoNico, series director Tetsuya Nomura mentioned Kingdom Hearts recording was underway along with the Final Fantasy VII Remake, and Dissidia Final Fantasy while discussing the progress of his latest projects.

    Tetsuya Nomura also makes sure to clarify that mentioning the recordings of "Sora and the others" is not in reference to Dissidia, but to Kingdom Hearts. However, it is unclear if the recording that he is talking about is for Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue or Kingdom Hearts III.

    Thank you to Twitter user @aibo_ac7 for the tip and thanks to Catherine Mueller (nichiei.translations@gmail.com) for clarification on the translation of the Tweet!

    What do you make of Tetusya Nomura's comments about the recordings? Let us know in the comments!

  14. Tetsuya Nomura Interviewed by Famitsu, discusses Kingdom Hearts III and Final Fantasy VII Remake.

    During MAGIC 2017, Famitsu had the opportunity to interview Kingdom Hearts series director Tetsuya Nomura about Kingdom Hearts III and Final Fantasy VII Remake. During the interview, he stated that the Heartless found in the latest Kingdom Hearts III screenshot is called the "Rock Troll" and it serves as a middle boss. You can view the interview here. Translations will be made available as soon as possible.

    KH3 Magic Screenshot 3

    Big thanks to @churroz for the tip!

    UPDATE: We now have translations, thanks to Katie Armstrong! View the translations of the Kingdom Hearts section of the interview below:

    Famitsu: Now, if I can ask about some recently published new images. In KH3, we’ve seen a battle scene in Thebes, in Olympus Coliseum. Is that enormous Heartless (Sora) is fighting a boss?

    Nomura: It’s a Rock Troll Heartless. We’re treating it as a mid-level boss.

    Famitsu: You told us that the Keyblade would be able to transform into two ‘patterns’ (forms). Is this the case for all Keyblades?

    Nomura: The ones we’re making right now have two transformations. Still, even though this Keyblade turns into a tank and a shield, [Keyblade forms] won’t necessarily be ‘attack’ and ‘defense’. The Keyblade in the previous video turns into two bow guns and a bazooka. The transformations depend on the Keyblade.

    Famitsu: So you’ll have to properly learn your way around them. And about that “Link” in the Commands…

    Nomura: Ah, that...next time we release more info, I’ll explain that. (Laughs)


    UPDATE 2: Here's the full translation for you to read. Thanks to Catherine Mueller (nichiei.translations@gmail.com)for the translations!

    Announcement Details from Tetsuya Nomura on [Kingdom Hearts III] and [Final Fantasy VII Remake] at [MAGIC 2017]

    From Monaco's Grimaldi Forum on 2/18/2017, “MAGIC 2017,” an entertainment event focusing on games and anime, opened, and Square Enix's Tetsuya Nomura made an appearance. We were able to ask him a few things, so we'll show you those answers here.

    An interview with Tetsuya Nomura on games in development

    --Before at MAGIC, Hashimoto-san was also able to come, it seems, but for you, this is the first time you've come. It's also the first time you've come to Monaco, isn't it?

    N: Yes. My schedule has been tightly packed and hasn't allowed me the chance to come before--I haven't looked around very much, but it seems to be a lovely place.

    --There are also other special guests here besides you, Nomura-san. Have you been able to mingle with them yet?

    N: I like Mike Mignola (Hellboy), so I was very happy to be standing with him today. He also greeted me on the day before MAGIC. Actually, several years ago, I received a signing from him via an acquaintance, and he had written “It'd be a pleasure to do work together someday.” It was very moving to be with him at the event.

    -- Did the event also receive international attention?

    N: I got the impression that there were a lot of people asking about the Japanese game industry. I answered that, currently in Japan, there are not enough people to develop HD titles, so the upside of this is that I can greater feel the splendor of international titles.

    --I see. Your fans are also excited right now. They gave you a standing ovation at the talk event, and there was also a long line for signings.

    N: I don't really go to Europe often, so I felt that the fans were very energetic. I did not have a interpreter with me this time, so it's possible I mistranslated or misunderstood some things that the fans told me while we were talking, but many fans brought very rare goods with them to the signings, so I was very happy.

    --With Cloud's design, you broke it down into five big steps, there was a phantom sixth step, and we heard a lot of stories we had yet to hear before at the talk event.

    N: It seemed like the perfect chance to talk about it. The “sixth” step for Cloud is made to be a bit more realistic, and his sword was made to look more western and was given more detail. We fixed up his head and body as well as added detail to his muscles, so he looks quite brawny (laughs). I didn't have a lot of time, so I actually wrote the script for the talk event late the night before, starting from details that had yet to be discussed, and the marketing team helped me make the slides... … The preparations lasted through the morning of the talk event, so it was tough (bitter laugh).

    --The result, though, was that everyone seemed to enjoy it. Not only did you talk about your own character's designs, but you also showed new images, etc.

    N: I was surprised, as I did not exactly imagine myself talking a lot. I really wanted to make sure everyone enjoyed themselves, so I talked about the PV making among other things that hadn't really been touched on yet.

    --The fans asked about the mysteries behind the making of the PV you helped with, right?

    N: When I handle the PVs, I have a pattern of assessing them emotionally. I change my feelings to the feelings of fans seeing it for the first time, hard-core fans, and indifferent people as I watch the PV over and over again. With the feelings of first-time fans especially, I repeat that action many times. Since they are thinking of the PV and the game as part the same production, that way thinking [when watching the PV] is the same.

    --Really, after seeing the PV so many times, if someone commanded me to watch it as if it's the first time each time, I don't think I could do it (laughs). Now, could I ask you about the new images you released to the public? For [Kingdom Hearts III], you showed a battle scene taking place in the city of Thebes in Olympus. The enemy was a giant Heartless, but was that a boss?

    N: It's a battle with the Rock Troll. It will be a mid-boss.

    --You told us before that the keyblade can change in two patterns, but into what kind of keyblade?

    N: The keyblade he's using here is in the two patterns. In addition, it won't always be an offensive and defensive division like the tank and shield keyblade we showed this time. The keyblade that came out in the PV before changed into a bow-gun and a bazooka. The transformations will vary depending on the keyblade itself.

    --So you can walk around using those for different things. The “link” display on the command menu is...

    N: That part we will explain next time we release news (laughs)

    --We'd also like to hear a bit about [Final Fantasy VII Remake]. In the screenshot, Cloud was taking cover action.

    N: As the story goes, there's a situation where he must sneak in someplace, so that means he can't just continue in the middle of the road the whole time. In the original there were random encounters, and with that we relied on imagination, but since we can smoothly transition into the infiltration, we decided it was an important factor for the game's realism. You can now hide behind things to let soldiers pass, or take their weapons and eliminate them. Of course, people who find that to be annoying can just push straight ahead and fight their way through.

    --Can Barrett also perform cover action?

    N: He can. However, I still can't say the details about this, but as a gunner, he has a special factor.

    --Is that so? The scene with Barrett and Cloud fighting the Guard Scorpion also left an impact.

    N: The scaffolding isn't the only place the battle occurs, but rather, we've developed it so that you can use the map's large space, and you can fight as you switch between Cloud and Barrett. For instance, for enemies that Cloud can't reach with his sword, changing over to Barrett will be more beneficial, so the fighting has become more strategic. The Guard Scorpion changes it's mode partway through, and it has behaviors that weren't in the original game. In this time's screenshot, you should be able to see that missiles and other things are falling. It's a very flashy fight.

    ^ Besides seeing that missiles are falling during the fight with Guard Scorpion, we can also see red circles showing where they will fall.

    --That's true. With the battles being so full of action, it seems like the gameplay will be quite different from the original.

    N: Parts of the map and other objects will be destroyed, and once you defeat a limb of the Guard Scorpion, it becomes destroyed.

    --The UI portions aren't completed yet, but the ATB gauge shows three stock slots, and I also noticed a technique name and level (TN: I don't know the name for the technique, but it appears to be something like “Critical Attack”). I also noticed the “materia” slot...

    N: We'll talk more about ATB and techniques another time. You could think of materia as something like a skill. It's different than magic, and you can use it when you've set materia that you're holding for battle use.

    --We're all anxiously awaiting more news about both [Kingdom Hearts III] and [Final Fantasy VII Remake].

    N: We were able to prepare some new material for the MAGIC event. Since the advertising plans for both titles have been decided, I could not tell you much now, but we've strengthened our organization and work is smoothly continuing, so please wait just a little longer.

  15. Tetsuya Nomura discusses Kingdom Hearts III with Official PlayStation Magazine UK, states that the fundamental gameplay mechanics almost completed

    In an interview with Official PlayStation Magazine UK, Tetsuya Nomura gives an official development update on Kingdom Hearts III. In the interview, Tetsuya Nomura discusses that the fundamental systems and mechanics are almost complete and they will be shifting developing onto the mass production of areas. Along with an update on the basic systems, he also states that smaller development areas such as mini-games are still varied when it comes to a completion progress. With development shifting more toward bigger aspects of Kingdom Hearts III, they hope to begin laying down the groundwork and making sure other big elements within Kingdom Hearts III are complete. You can read what Tetsuya Nomura said regarding Kingdom Hearts III's current development state below thanks to the report by PlayStation Universe.

    For the most part we've established the ground foundations, like the basic systems and mechanics of what's going to go in the game. Development of that is pretty much close to complete. But of course, since this is an HD title, it's now building the resources, and development of the 'mass' elements of it, like mass production of the areas and the actual things that are going into the game.

    Other elements, including the mini-games and other various smaller items; their progress is very varied...some of them are polished and very close to final state, but at the same time some elements are still in the planning phase and I haven't laid out the groundwork yet. But the basic structure of what's going to go in the game is set, it's now a matter of mass production of the different elements.


    Update: We've included the entire interview under the spoiler tag. Nomura discusses world selection, the preparation of his development team, and specifications on the Attraction Flow moves.

    Spoiler


    New Kingdom Hearts III information is going to be revealed at this year's D23 Expo in Anaheim, California. Are you excited for the Kingdom Hearts III news next month with this development update by Tetsuya Nomura? Let us know in the comments!

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